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Archive for September, 2011

The Health at Every Size model for living is simply eating healthy foods and exercising regardless of weight.  I suggest reading more about it by clicking on the “Linda Bacon” link on my blogroll.  Health at Every Size means not dieting and accepting your body the shape it is, while at the same time caring for it.  I think it’s a wonderful concept because it goes against the idea that we all need to be very thin, and it encourages caring for one’s body for the gift it is. 

I also suggest reading this blog post by Golda Poretsky at Bodylovewellness.com, where she does a great job of showing the difference between dieting and the Health at Every Size approach to food:

http://www.bodylovewellness.com/2011/01/17/breaking-down-the-desire-to-be-thinner/

 

I realize it’s very difficult to change your way of thinking.  We are all so steeped in the myth that we need to be thin and if we aren’t, it’s our fault and there’s something terribly wrong with us.  But this just isn’t true.  In my experience, as I’ve searched out the truth about dieting and challenged my own assumptions about the pursuit of “thin”, my thought patterns have changed.  It’s a slow change, since I was pretty brainwashed by our culture of thinness, but there has been change.  I’m more grateful for my body and the way God made it, and for how healthy it is, and for the things I can do because of it.  I’m confident that more women out there can experience this change as well, and that hopefully, information such as the links in this post will help you break out of cultural assumptions.

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Here is yet another quote from “Health at Every Size”(page 150) by Linda Bacon:

“The weight-loss industry, of course, has a multibillion-dollar interest in promoting the view that “overweight” is dangerous and unattractive and that weight can be controlled by dietary manipulation, drugs, or other consciously applied techniques, and we can’t ignore the tremendous influence they have had in fueling our cultural hysteria about weight.  Body-conscious Americans spent over $58 billion last year to lose weight, and that number is expected to continue to balloon.”

Our cultural obsession with being thin is a manipulation.  If all I care about is being as thin as possible, then I’m blinded and distracted from finding the truth.  I accept the lie that I’m fat and constantly need to lose weight.  But the truth is that there is no evidence that diets work in the long-term.  On the contrary, there is evidence that diets do harm in the long run, and can compromise health.  They also make people have unhealthy obsessions about what they can eat or not eat, which destroys food culture.  Instead of trying to control weight, we should be concerned about what makes us healthy.  That is, getting a moderate amount of exercise and eating wholesome foods. 

(Forgive me for “over-quoting” this book, but it just rings so true with me!  I think many people don’t know that books like these exist, and therefore won’t get the chance to know the truth about why we’re all so obsessed with weight and appearance.  I simply want to put this information out there and share the good news.)

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What is more important than weight and appearance?

~  My relationship with my husband.

~  My relationship with my children.

~  My relationship with my immediate and extended family.

~  My relationship with my friends.

~  How I treat the above people…hopefully with compassion, understanding, and patience.

~  How I treat strangers…hopefully with compassion, understanding, and patience.

~  That I use the gifts God has given me to the best of my ability.

~  My relationship with God.

~  Pretty much EVERYTHING.

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